Android Phones

Motorola CEO blames Android apps for phone quality issues, thinks Blur can fix that

June 3, 2011 | by Andrew Kameka

Motorola

sanjay-jha-motorola-droid-x

Why does your Motorola phone freeze so much? How on Earth can you explain the lag or apps that work perfectly fine on other phones yet seem to crash on your Atrix 4G or Droid X? You would naturally assume that there’s something wrong with your Motorola phone, but the problem is actually those crappy apps developed by third-parties.

At least that’s what Motorola CEO Sanjay Jha would have you believe. In a webcast presentation yesterday, Jha downplayed the obvious failings of MOTOBLUR and pointed the blame squarely on poorly constructed Android Market apps that hinder performance. These apps eat battery life and lead to errors that, according to Jha, cause up to 70 percent of the returned Motorola Android phones.

While there are obviously a large number of Android apps that have problems and don’t deserve to be in the Android Market, it’s laughable that Motorola would pin its failings on those apps. I’ve tested several Motorola devices and each time, no matter how far the technology advances, I walk away hating MOTOBLUR even more. And many of the errors that I’ve experienced on those phones happened out-of-the-box before I even launched the Android Market. Perhaps Jha should look twice at the bloatware he and carriers place on Motorola devices and its tweaked versions of Android, that also never seem to get the advancements and improvements that Google offers to deal with some of these very performance issues, before blaming developers.

Jha is actually going in the opposite direction and painting MOTOBLUR as the very thing that will prevent poor performance by warning users about poor apps. More than 10 million MOTOBLUR phones send usage statistics to Motorola, so Jha believes that the company is close to developing a system that can analyze that data and build a list of faulty apps. So if an app performs poorly on Blur devices, users will get a warning before downloading that the app may affect performance.

[PCWorld]