Android News

Potential Buyers Getting Wary of Notion Ink, Rohan to Respond

December 10, 2010 | by Michael Heller

Android News, Tablets

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Android Police has put up an overview of some suspicious things happening surrounding the Notion Ink pre-orders. Apparently, there are quite a lot of vagaries and curious choices in language and design. There have been a number of unclear fees and restrictions in regards to the return and refund policies, and there are no product images on the purchase page, which leads to unsavory thoughts of a potential bait and switch.
Overall, I agree with AP that there are troubling issues with how the pre-order process is being handled, and the terms and conditions behind it all. It seems Rohan Shravan has seen the post as well and in his latest blog post, he has said he will be commenting on the troubles and the concerns raised by Android Police.
As I said, I understand the hesitation and suspicion voiced in the Android Police article, but one point needs to be addressed:
The AP article raises concern over the price, stating:
The top-end model will cost you $549 – A  3G Galaxy S Tab, a device with far fewer features, will run you $650. Samsung is famous for the low unlocked pricing on its Galaxy S phones, and it seems unlikely the Tab carries a significantly inflated price tag. How then can Notion Ink, a startup from India, claim to be able to undercut one of the world’s biggest manufacturers of memory and displays?
Teardowns have already shown that the Tab has a manufacturing cost of about $215, so clearly the Tab does carry a significantly inflated price tag. So, Notion Ink could very well charge less for a tablet with more features, if they decide to take less revenue on each sale. As a startup, they need to find ways to beat the brand recognition of Samsung, HTC and Motorola, and being cheaper with more features is a good way to do that.
As for the other issues, we’ll just have to see if Rohan responds. And, as always in the world of tech and startups, we have to remember that a product is only as good as it performs in the real world. Unfortunately, that is something we have yet to see from the Adam.